Op Internet hebben wij veel gevonden over personen met de naam Belet.

I. Website: www.legrice.co.nz  

One "Robertum Le Grys" is mentioned in The Feet of Fines, Norfolk, 1198 - 1202 Case No 153 File 9; No 217 Norf'. and again in July 1202 "Case 154 File 21 No 215 Norf" This Robertum is probably Sir Robert. Case No 153. (Hec est finales concordia facto in curia domini regis apud Norwic in die sancte Fideli Ano regni regis Ricardi I (6th Oct 1198) coram R Ekliens anchidiacono William de Warenn. Roberto filio Roger, William de Ruben, Observe filio Hereul, Michaele Belet et alus baronibus et fidelibus domini regis ibidem tunc presentibus inter Rogerum filium Willelmi et Robertum and Richerum pententes et Robertum le Gris tenentem de XVI acris terre cam pertinentes in Turton unde recognitio de morte antecessoris surmonita flait inter eos in ore facto curia scilicet quod predicti Rogerus et Robertus et Richerus remiserunt et quitum clamaurunt totumjus et clamium saum quod habuerunt in predicta terre cum pertinentus precacto Roberto le Gris et heribus suis in perpetaum pro tibus marc is argenti". 

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II. Website: www.indixie.com/genealogy 
No. A64 1091. 
Geoffroi et Roger, fils de Gilbert, tous deux chevaliers, donnent à lábbaye Saint-Pierre de Préaux une acre de terre sise en leur domaine de Campigny, pour l'âme de leur frère Robert Belet récemment tué à Evreux. Ils ajoutent sept autres acres que leur père avait depuis longtemps engagé auprès des moines contre cinquante sous de roumois qu'il avait reçus de son vivant.

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III. Website: www.indixie.com/genealogy 
C. Cartulaire du XVe siècle, BnF nouv. Acq. Lat. 1929, fol.73v, no 247.

Henri Ier fut assiégé au Mont-Saint-Michel par ses frères Guillaume II, roi d'Angleterre, et Robert Courte-Heuse pendant tout le Carême 1091 (du 26 février au 13 avril 1091); la réconciliation entre les frères intervint avant l'été (David, Charles Wendel, Robert Curthose Duke of Normandy, Cambridge, Harvars University Press, 1920, p.62-64-65).


Anno quo Willelmus Rufus, rex Anglorum, et Robertus, comes Normannorum, obsederunt suum fratrem Henricum in Monte Sancti Michaelis, duo fratres, silicet Gaufridus (a) et Rogerius, filii Gislebert, venerunt in capitulum monarchum Pratellensium et pro anima Robert Beleth, fratris eorum recenter, interfecti apud Ebroicas, et pro animabus suorum parentum per unum cutellum portantes super altare sancti Petri, astante omni conventu et multis laicis, dederunt perpetualiter sancto Petro et monachis agrum terre quem in suo dominio habebant in Campiniaco et illos septem alios agros terre quos pater eorumdem militum abbati Pratellensi et monachus posuerat jamque diu in vadimonium tenuerant pro quinquaginta solidis romeisinorum. Hos autem denarios predictus Gislebertus ab abbata et a monachis receperat cum adviveret. Hujus donationis testes affuerunt ex parte ipsorum: Willelmus, nepos et armiger eorum (b); Ricardus Wanescrot; ex parte abbatis: Willelmus Maledoctus; Radulfus Cocus; Hunfridus, hospitator; Gaufridus Polardus; Rogerius filius Christiani; Ascelinus; Postellus Parvulus.

From: "Steve Chapman" < schap@lds.co.uk>
Subjest: RE: (DOR) Winterborne Billet
Date: Wed. 26 Jul 2000 09:04:41 +0100
In-Reply-To: <397CE20D.3CDFF66E@iinet.net.au>


Hi Caroline
Winterborne Billet is Winterborne Came. Appears as Belet, Byllett, 16th century surveys show it as Winterborne Came Bellette & Stafford, and Wynterborne Byllett. On different Winterborne than Kingston, other refs Place Names of Dorset voll by Dave Mills.
Steve in Zelston.

----Original message----
From: Caroline Ingram (mailto:cingram@iinet.net.au)
Sent: 25 July 2000 01:41
To: Dorset-L@rootsweb.com
Subject: (DOR) Winterborne Billet

Hi
I have a survey that shows my ancestor occupying a farm in Winterborn Billet in 1637. Does any one know where this was? I would expect it to be somewhere cloes to Winterborne Kingston probably.
Regards
Caroline Ingram
Western Australia


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IV. Website: www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk  

Neville or Nevill of Essex
Volume 9, page 483, and note j (and continuation on page 484)
John de Neville (d. by 1282):
(The evidence suggests that his second wife, Margaret, may have been the daughter of a child of Ralph Belet and Sybil de Cormeilles, laetr the wife of Hugh Giffard of Boyton (Proposed) 

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V. Website: www.origins.org.uk  
Norfolk: East Rudham
William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1845.

Rudham (East) is a considerable village, on the Lynn road, 7 miles W. of Fakenham, celebrated for two large annual fairs for cattle and merchandise, held on May 17th and October 14th, under a charter granted by King John to the ancient and honorable family of Belet , who long held this parish, and founded in it Coxford Priory, on the banks of a rivulet, nearly 2 miles E. of the village adjacent to Tattersett. This extensive priory, of which but little is known, had a boundary wall enclosing about 30 acres, and two large pieces of it, with a noble arch, are still standing. It was granted at the dissolution of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. A small pot of Roman coins was dug up amongst the ruins, in 1719.


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VI. Website: www.raub-and-more.com  
Belet
Henry J. Belet
1852 - 1920
Henrietta G. his wife
1852 - 1907


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VII. Website: www.dor-mus.demon.co.uk  

Belet, family of, 22 133-135
11th to 14th cent., 106 43-49
The Belets. Notes on a Mediaeval Forsetshire Family from the 11th to the 14th centuries. Clive Harfield - 43 - 49.
Domesday holdings, 106 43
Family tree, 106 48-49
Manorial seat, (?) Woodsford, 106 47
Michael I and Michael II, 106 48
Robert I, Sheriff of Dorset, 1199, 106 43, 44-45
William I, II and IV, 106 43-46


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VIII. Website: www.berkshirehistory.com/castles/moated_manors.html 

Balsdon Manor (Kintbury):
Occasionally called "Balsdon Castle", there is no reason to suppose that this site was anything more than a manor. A fine circular inner and irregular pentangular outer moats stand north of Folly Yoad, above Inkpen, at Blandy's Corner. Ruin dismantles to build cottage between 1820 & 30. Used to have a drawbridge. Well exists (formerly in house). Depressions are supposedly fishponds. Park said to have enclosed 124 acres. Drive from Inkpen Common still discernable. The name derives from Beletson. John Belet owned the manor in 1224. Owners: Nicholas Yattendon (1272); Richard Polehampton (1313); Edmond Chelrey, MP for Berks (1372); Almaric St. Amand & Braybrooke; Elizabeth Darrel (heiress of Sir Thomas Calston (of Littlecote)(d.1464); Sir Edward Darrel (d.1539).

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IX. Website: www.combes-families.org 
Wroxton, a parish in the Hundred of Bloxham, 3 miles west northwest of Banbury, containing the capelry of Balscott, 792 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Oxford, and in the patronage of the Marquis of Bute. The church is dedicated to All Saints. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. A priory of Augustine canons, in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary, was founded early in the reign of Henry III, by Michael Belet, which at the dissolution was granted to Sir Thomas Pope, who afterwards bestowed it on Trinity College, Oxford.


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X. Website: www.stirnet.com/HTML/genie/british/cc4aq/cheyne01.htm 
Ralf de Caisneto (a 1086)
m. Maud (dau of William de Watville) name found on web site
1. Ralf de Caisneto
m. Emma
A. John de Caisneto
i. Emma de Caisneto = Emma de Chesney
m. Michael Belet
ii. Alice de Caisneto = Alice de Chesney
m. Geoffrey de Sai (b.c1155, d 1230)


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XI. Website: www.southcote.net 

The Hamlet of Southcote (Sudcote, Southcott) lies to the South-West of Reading. In 1080 Southcote was held by William de Braose.

By the early 13th century it had been attaches by the Braoses to the honour of Knepp (co.Sussex), of which it was held by Henry Belet. In 1337 a grant of free warren was made to Michael Belet for his demesne lands there.

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XII. Website: www.fmg.ac 
The wife of Geoffrey de Say I was actually Alice de Chesney, whose parentage was established by Round, from comments in Dugdale's Baronage, based on the cartulary of Oxford (Norfolk). These showed that Alice, the wife of Geoffrey de Say, and Emma, the wife of Michael Belet, were daughters and coheirs of John de Chesney.

Evidently, the Says' interest in the Maminot lands came through this John de Chesney. John was the son of Ralph de Chesney and the grandsaon of another Ralph, a Domesday tenant. The cartulary of Merton Priory records that Hugh Maminot (the grandfather of Walkelin) gave the manor of Petham (Kent) to Ralph de Chesney in marriage with his daughter Alice. Chronologically, this would be John's father rather than his grandfather. So Geoffrey de Say succeeded Walkelin Maminot as a result of his marriage to the granddaughter of Walkelin's aunt.

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XIII. Website: www.martinstown.co.uk  

Know that we have given in marriage to Randolf Tirell, our servant, a daughter of Falk de Oiri, who was the wife of J. Belet, and we command her that she receive him as her husband.

And so it was that the settlement of Frome Belet near Dorchester would disappear. (= in 1204).


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XIV. Website: www.middlesexpast.net 

In 1350 the abbey let the Maduit estate including the rents to Roger Belet for 40 years at 41s. a year, though a vacant plot on Tothill Street which was part of the estate was leased to him separately for 60 years at 12 d.; Belet already held three of the tenements from which the 7s. 6d. rent came. In 1398 Robert Chaundler was the lessee of the garden formerly of Robert Mauduit for 41s. paid to the inner treasurer, who paid the 11s. to the infirmerer and 6s. 4d. to the cellarer. Mauduitsgarden continued to be so identified in the abbey's accounts; in 1465 it was a messuage also called Caleys. 

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XV. Website: www.british-history.ac.uk  

In the reign of Edward III Robert de Eglesfeld held the manor of La Hyde in Laleham. He held it by gift from his father, John de Eglesfeld, who was one of the heirs of John de Crokedayk. The Eglesfelds and the Crokedayks were Cumberland families and it is possible that the latter represents a branche of the Criketots and that the manor of La Hyde was part of the 8 hides held by Robert Blunt in 1086. There is, however, no actual proof of the connexion, nor is Laleham mentioned among the lands inherited by John de Eglesfeld from John de Crokedayk. Robert de Eglesfeld son of John was chaplain to Queen Philippa, the consort of Edward III and the founder of Queen's College, Oxford. His manor of La Hyde apparently gave its name to a pasture known as the Hyde Acre. An extent taken in 1327 shows that it lay in Laleham, Littleton and Staines and that it had a house and garden, stables, a grange and that there were in demesne 36,5 acres of arable and 9 acres of pasture; the whole being wordth £6 14s. 10,5d. In 1328 Robert de Eglesfeld granted the manor to Edward III in exchamge for Renwick or Ravenswyck, a hamlet in Cumberland. The king added La Hyde to the manor of Kempton, in Sunbury parish and gave it into the custody of John de L'Isle, the constable of Windsor Castle. The capital messuage and garden and demesne lands were then held by Roger Belet, the pantler (panetarius) of the queen's household, an office which seems to have been
hereditary in the Belet family since the reign of John. In 1337 these lands were granted to Roger to hold in fee by the services due, though the estate still remained in the manorial jurisdiction of Kempton. In 1366 Belet conveyed these and the reversion of all his lands in Staines, Littleton and Laleham to the abbey of Westminster. From this time it seems to have been distinguished under the name of Beletes tenement. At the Dissolution it was probably represented by the ´manor" of Billets, which was valued separately from that of Laleham at thr sum of £ 6 13s., 4d. It was surrendered with the rest of the abbey's lands to the Crown and was annexed to the honour of Hampton Court. 
(See footnotes: 80 tot en met 96).

NB. Panetarius = bakker = pantler = the servant or officer in a great family who has charge of the bread and the pantry.

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XVI. Website: www.british-history.ac.uk 

Manor and other estates.
Until the 19th century much of Lew belaonged to the royal maor of Bampton and to its successor Bampton Earls. A sepearte estate in Lew and Weald, built up by Osney abbey during the 12th and 13th centuries, was called LEW manor in 1542 and 1546, but in fact formed a member of the abbey's manor or bailiwick of Black Bourton. Geoffrey Gibewyn gave six yardlands to the abbey c. 1225, perhaps the 1,5 hides held by Hugh de Bolbec of Walter Giffard in 1086, but by 1279 two yardlands had become detached, perhaps in connexion with a fine of 1198 or following a dispute with the Belet family in 1227. A rent charge of 24s. from Bampton manor, part of a prebend of 60s. formerly held by Peverel the priest and granted to the abbey by the Empress Maud in 1141, was exchanged c. 1170 by Matthew, count of Boulogne, for 0,5 yardland in Weald and a fishery at Rushey on the river Thames and during the 13th century there were further small grnats of meadows, common rights and fisheries.
(See footnotes 79 tot en met 83). 

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XVII. Website: www.british-history.ac.uk 
Churches.
A "free chapel" in the patronage of the Belet family and endownes with tithes from their lands existed by 1224, when Exeter cathedral unsuccessfully challenged the arrangement. Before 1303 the chapel acquired some glebe, said to be 15 a. in 1399. The advowson passed in the 24th century to a succession of owners, including members of the Talbot and Laundels femilies and in 1399, Thomas Dyer, a vicar of Bampton, who as patron was to offer 1 lb. Of wax before the image of the Blessed Virgin at Lew on the feast of the Assumption. No appointments are known, though Robert of Cokethorpe, chaplain, involved in the suit of 1224, perhaps served the chapel. In 1549 following suppression of chantries, the chapel was sold as a chantry or free chapel of Lew "founded" by Thomas Dyer, with 7 a. of openfield arable and corn tithes from 7 yardlands and 7 a., together yielding 6s. 8 d. a year; in 1575 it was bought by London speculators as a "cottage or tenement" formerly given for maintenance of a light Chapel orchard, adjoining Witney road, was mmentioned in the later 18th century, but the cahepl's location is otherwise unknown.
(See footnotes 87 tot en met 92).


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XVIII. Website: www.medway.gov.uk 
Witnesses to the inspeximus of King Henry III

Walter, Bishop of Bath and Wells
Hugh le Bigod
Roger de Mortuo Mri
Roger de Clifford
Roger de Leyburn
Robert Walerand
William de Axte
William Belet
Ralph de Bakepuz
Peter de Champvent 


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XIX. Website: www.british-history.ac.uk 
Manors and other estates
The identifiable Domesday estates in the parish are Broomfield, Blaxhold and possibly Denesmodeswelle, while Heathcombe manor first occurs in the later 12th century and Ivyton manor by the later 13th century.
Broomfield was held by Alnod in 1066 and by William de Mohun in 1086. It was claimed as part of Dunster honir until 1777 or later although in 1460 it was said to be held in chief. It was probably one of the fees held in 1166 of William de Mohun (d.1176) by Gerbert de Percy (d.1179) in right of his wife Maud Arundel and they were succeeded at Broomfield by one of their daughters Alice, wife of Robert de Glastonia. Alice's daughter Maud married Roger de Newburgh (d.1194) and held the manor as a widow in John's reign and was followed by her son Robert de Newburgh (d.1246). In 1227 Robert gave the manor in fee to his sister Margery, wife of William Belet, creating a mesne lordship in which he was succeeded by his son Henry (d.1271). William de Montagu (d.1270) appears to have acquired it and was succeeded by his son Simon. The Montagu familiy, which held Kingslands and Oggsho;e elsewhere in the parish, held the mesne lordship until 1415 or later.


The terre tenancy of Margery Belet passed on her death (after 1241) to her son Robert (d.c.1256). Robert's son William granted it to John de la Linde (d1272) who was succeeded by his son Walter. Walter held the manor in 1285 and 1316 but in 1303 it was said to be held by William de Welle, Walter de la Linde's bailiff in 1279. In 1330 Broomfieldwas said to be held by Robert de Burgh and Walter de la Linde, although the latter was dead. Robert was bailiff of the manor in 1313 and the highest taxpayer in 1327.
(See footnotes 45 tot en met 56). 

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XX. Website: home.clara.net  

In the early 12th century the Belet's were the undertenants of Wroxton. The first recorded member of the family to hold the state was Harvey, whose son Michael was hereditary butler to Henry II. He was succeeded in this office and as tenant of the estate by his son, Master Michael, lawyer and canonist and friend of Greathead, Bishop of Lincoln. In his capacity as King's Butler he officiated at the wedding of Henry II to Eleanor of Provence.

The village church is known to have existed as early as 1217. Its first known rector, Michael Belet, is recorded as having begun his ministry in 1200. At some time between 1200 and 1209, King John granted Belet a charter for the foundation of a priory in Wroxton. The charter was ratified in 1251 by Henry III, but not until an inspection had proved that all its terms and conditions had been fulfilled. Belet founded his Augustinian Priory in the original building now known as the Abbey and arranged that it should have the patronage of the church, ie, be responsible for the appointment of its clergy. In 1395 the Prior and Canons appropriated the church entirely to their own use. After that the priest was usually selected from among their number.

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XXI. Website: www.57.1911encyclopedia.org 
Belet has his namesake in the weasel. In ancient shields almost all beasts and birds other than the lion and the eagle play upon the bearers name. No object is so humble that it is unwelcome to the knight seeking a pun for his shield.

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XXII. Website: www.communigate.co.uk  

...It was not until the middle ages... 
...and the establishment of Wroxton Abbey that the village began to thrive.

Michael Belet founded an Augustinian Priory... 
...in honour of St Mary in 1217 - hence the village is often referred to as Wroxton - St Mary.

...It was not until the middle ages...

...and the establishment of Wroxton Abbey that the village began to thrive.

Michael Belet founded an Augustinian Priory...

in honour of St Mary in 1217 - hence the village is often referred to as Wroxton - St Mary.


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XXIII. Website: www.unicaen.fr/mrsh  

Gedeelte van: Fécamp et les rois anglo-normands
(Fécamp and the anglo-norman kings) 
Judith Ann GREEN
School of Modern History, 
The Queen's University of Belfast, 
Belfast BT7 1NN 
Northern Ireland 
j.green@qub.ac.uk
Guillaume le Roux et Robert Courteheuse se sont battus pour y exercer leur suprématie entre1088 et1094; l'un et l'autre ont vraisembablement visité l'abbaye, à cette époque, mais ne l'ont plus visitée par la suite. Pour autant qu'on le sache, Henri Ier non plus ne s'y est pas rendu, car il préférait traverser la Manche pour se rendre en Angleterre en empruntant la route occidentale. Quand il se trouvait en Normandie, il avait tendance à tenir ses grandes cours à Rouen ou à Caen. Fécamp avait été le lieu de sépulture des ducs Richard Ier, Richard II et de Marguerite du Maine, la fiancée de Robert Courteheuse, mais l'abbaye n'est pas devenue la nécropole de la maison régnante en Normandie comme, par exemple, Saint-Denis l'est devenue pour les Capétiens.

Les dernières années du XIesiècle ont été difficiles pour l'abbaye, à cause des luttes entre les fils du Conquérant. Robert avait pourtant bien commencé à s'attirer les faveurs des moines en leur restituant certaines terres que l'abbaye avait perdues et il leur avait octroyé une foire qui devait durer tout le temps de la prise du hareng. En revanche, dans ses efforts pour rassembler une flotte afin d'envahir l'Angleterre en 1088, il a capturé des vaisseaux appartenant aux moines; l'un d'eux, ancré dans la Seine, a été détourné de force. Robert a tenté de renforcer son autorité aux environs de Fécamp, installant plusieurs de ses fidèles comme Guillaume Grenet, Gilbert Belet, Geoffroi Martel, Robert d'Estouteville, sur des terres issues du domaine ducal. Pourtant, cette tentative a provoqué des troubles dans un cas au moins, et il a fait détruire le château d'un autre nouveau-venu, Robert de Mortagne.

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XXIV. Website: www.1911encyclopedia.org 
LYME REGIS, a market town and municipal borough and watering-place in the western parliamentary division of Dorsetshire, England, I 51 m. W.S.W. of London by the London & South Western railway, the terminus of a light railway from Axminster. Pop. (1905) 2095. It is situated at the mouth of a narrow combe or valley opening upon a fine precipitous coast-line; there is a sandy shore affording excellent bathing, and the country inland is beautiful. The church of St Michael and All Angels is mainly Perpendicular, but the tower (formerly central) and the portion west of it are Norman. A guildhall and assembly rooms are the chief public buildings. The principal industries are stonequarrying and the manufacture of cement. There is a curved pier of ancient foundation known as the Cobb. The harbour, with a small coasting trade, is under the authority of the corporation. The borough is under a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 councillors. Area, 1237 acres. 
No evidence of settlement on the site of Lyme Regis exists before that afforded by a grant, dated 774, purporting to be by Cynewulf, king of the West-Saxons, of land here to the church of Sherborne, and a similar grant by King Ethelstan to the church of Glastonbury. In 1086 three manors of Lyme are mentioned: 
that belonging to Sherborne abbey, which was granted at the dissolution to Thomas Goodwin, who alienated it in the following year; that belonging to Glastonbury, which seems to have passed into lay lands during the middle ages, and that belonging to William Belet. The last was acquired by the family of Bayeux, from whom it passed by marriage to Elias de Rabayne, whose nephew, Peter Baudrat, surrendered it to the crown in 1315-1316 when the king became lord of one moiety of the borough, henceforth known as Lyme Regis. Lyme ranked as a port in 1234, and Edward I. in 1284 granted to the town a charter making it a free borough, with a merchant gild, and in the same year the mayor and bailiffs are mentioned. In the following January the bailiffs were given freedom from pleading without the borough, freedom from toll and privileges implying considerable foreign trade; the importance of the port is also evident from the demand of two ships for the kings service in 1311. In 1332-1333 Edward III. granted Lyme to the burgesses at a fee-farm of 32 marks; on the petition of the inhabitants, who were impoverished by tempests and high tides, this was reduced to ioo shillings in 1410 and to 5 marks in 1481. In 159 Elizabeth incorporated Lyme, and further charters were obtained from James I., Charles II. and William III. Lyme returned two members to parliament from 1295 to 1832 when the representation was reduced to one. The borough was disfranchised in 1867. The fairs granted in 5553 for the 1st of February and the 20th of September
are now held on altered dates. Trade with France in wine and cloth was carried on as early as 1284, but was probably much increased on the erection of the Cobb, first mentioned in 1328 as built of timber and rock. Its medieval importance as the only shelter between Portland Roads and the river Exe caused the burgesses to receive grants of quayage for its maintenance in 1335 and many subsequent years, while its convenience probably did much to bring upon Lyme the unsuccessful siege by Prince Maurice in 1644. In 1685 Lyme was the scene of the landing of James, duke of Monmouth, in his attempt upon the throne.

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XXV. Website: www.sole.org.uk  
It had been assumed, in my branch of the SAUL family, that the name had been French and originated with the Norman Conquest, or possibly with the Huguenots. Here, it seemed to me, was proof positive backed up by a similar reference found in the Victorian History of the County of Dorset, Vol. Ill:
"In Canendone Hundred, a thegn held 2 hides and 1 virgate at farm of the king. This is the hidage of Hampreston which William Belet held of the queen according to Exon Domesday and which Saul held T.R.E. (in the Reign of Edward)."
So clearly, Saul was a property holder, a substantial one at that, of this part of England before the Normans came ? at least old William's Normans ? and it is
suggested that the estate could have been a grant from the King of Wessex. That's another step back in time.

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XXVI. Websites: www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk  en www.fmg.ac 
Uit: Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage. Volume 11: Say
Page 468:
GEOFFREY DE SAY II, 2nd but 1st surv. s. and h. by 1st wife, was b. probably about 1155. In 1180 in the account of the farm of the Vicomté of Arques he is acquitted in respect of a liability of 10s "for the land of Geoffrey de Sai which he had with the wife of Hugh de Periers."(e) In the same year he was amerced at the Forest Assize in respect of Hudwic' & Dodinton' (Ditton Priors, Salop); and, again in 1180, with the consent of his wife, he delivered to the prior of Wenlock his manor of Ditton Priors, which was her dower from Hugh de Periers.(f) In 1190 Michael Belet accounted for 100li to have right against him of the inheritance of his wife and to have his office.(g) In 1198 he was bailiff of Arques.(h)
Note e:
Stapleton, Mag. Rot. Scacc. Norm., vol. i, pp. cxxiv, 90.
Note f:
Eyton, Shropshire, vol. iii, p. 332.
Note g:
Pipe Roll, 2 Ric. I, p. 102. Michael had m. Emma, sister of Alice de Chesney; see p. 470, note "f" below.
Note h:
Stapleton, op. cit., vol. ii, p. cxxix. It has been assumed that this entry and the entries as to lands in Normandy which follow relate to Geoffrey II. If so, it was probably the same Geoffrey who in 1184 owed 33li 12s for 4 measures of wheat which he had for provisioning the castle of Gisors (D'Anisy, Mém. de la Soc. des Antiquaires de Normandie, vol. viii, p. 361). 
As Geoffrey was a younger son of parents who were married after 1175, he was probably born around 1180 (see correction to p. 467 above). The references above from the period 1180-1190, and presumably also the one from 1198, must relate to his father, Geoffrey I. Michael Belet's wife Emma was the sister of Geoffrey I's wife. 

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XXVII. Website: homepage.mac.com  (member:philipdavies) 

Rectangular moated site which has been identified as the site of the fortified manor known as Marham Castle. The moated site has maximun overall dimensions of 80 m. north west - south east by 77 m. north east - south west. The moat surrounds a central platform, on which are the remains of a substantial building. Mounds up to 1,5 m. in height, projecting externally at the four corners of this enclosure, mark the location of what were probably turrets. The manor of Marham was held in the second half of C13 by William Belet, who received licence to cranellate his house there in 1271.


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XXVIII. Website: www.rbgk.ew.org.uk/heritage/timeline/medieval_12_14C.html 
12th - 14th Centuries
Henry I granted the manor of Shene to the Norman family of Belet in the 12th century, and it remained in their possession for over 100 years. By 1290, Edward I had acquired large areas of Shene, and by 1313 he owned the manor itself, south of the area now known as the Old Deer Park. Edward founded a house of Carmelite monks at the manor, where they stayed for two years until Edward moved them to Oxford. He then gave the manor to his wife, Isabella, who held it until her death in 1358. Edward III inherited the manor from his mother, Isabella, and converted it into a moated royal palace with a hunting ground extending as far as Kew.

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XXIX. Website www.history.ac.uk  

Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs to 1516.
GAYTON 5731 3193. 1334 Subsidy £225.
M
(Charter) Wed; mercatum, gr 15 Jun 1254, by K Hen III to William Belet. To be held at the manor (Roles Gascons, 1242-54, no. 3784; CPR, 1247-58, p. 305). Fair recorded between 1298 and 1300 (Abb. Plac., p. 220).
F
(Charter) vf+2, Gregory (12 Mar); gr 15 Jun 1254, by K Hen III to William Belet. To be held at the manor (Roles Gascons, 1242-54, no. 3784; CPR, 1247-58, p. 305). Fair recorded between 1298 and 1300 (Abb. Plac., p. 220).
MARHAM 5708 3097. 1334 Subsidy £157.50.
M
(Charter) Tues; gr 7 Feb 1260, by K Hen III to William Belet (CPR, 1258-66, pp. 116-17). 
F
(Charter) vfm, Decollation of John the Baptist (29 Aug); gr 7 Feb 1260, by K Hen III to William Belet (CPR, 1258-66, pp. 116-17).
WEST TOFTS 5836 2929. 1334 Subsidy £56.05.
M
(Charter) Tues; gr 7 Feb 1260, by K Hen III to William Belet (CPR, 1258-66, pp. 116-17). 

(Charter) vfm, Lawrence (10 Aug); gr 7 Feb 1260, by K Hen III to William Belet (CPR, 1258-66, pp. 116-17).

naar
boven